CALIFORNIA’S PROPOSED PVC PACKAGING PHASE-OUT

Polyvinylchloride (PVC) packaging contains highly toxic heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. It also contains high levels of hormone-disrupting phthalates. In California, very little PVC packaging is recycled and is instead littered or landfilled which allows for toxins to accumulate in the environment. Existing law in California currently restricts the use of certain phthalates


LOW DUTY MEXICO TPL (1) CLOSED MAY 27, 2008

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the low-duty tariff preference level (TPL) for Mexico filled on May 27, 2008 at approximately 1:50 P.M. Mexican TPL (1) is not eligible for any increases. Mexican TPL (1) covers cotton or manmade fibre apparel imported from Mexico to the USA. Mexico TPL (1)


CALIFORNIA’S PROPOSED PVC PACKAGING PHASE-OUT

Polyvinylchloride (PVC) packaging contains highly toxic heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. It also contains high levels of hormone-disrupting phthalates. In California, very little PVC packaging is recycled and is instead littered or landfilled which allows for toxins to accumulate in the environment. Existing law in California currently restricts the use of certain phthalates


CHINA TEXTILE/APPAREL QUOTAS SCHEDULED TO EXPIRE DECEMBER 31, 2008

According to The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements (CITA) sources, the quotas imposed on certain China-origin textile and apparel good, pursuant to the U.S.-China Textile Agreement, will end on December 31, 2008. Any over-shipments that are exported in 2008 are likely to be subject to staged entry in 2009.


UPDATE TO PROPOSED ELIMINATION OF FIRST SALE RULE

In January of this year, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) proposed to eliminate the favourable “First Sale” method of valuation. This action could raise import tariffs by as much as 15%. U.S. Congress has moved to stop U.S. Customs from revoking the First Sale Rule. CBP has been inundated with opposition


U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE NOTICE ON CERTAIN CITES REGULATED SPECIES

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) requires each CITES Party country to designate a Management Authority and a Scientific Authority for, among other things, issuance of CITES documents. The treaty also requires each non-Party country to have competent authorities that can issue comparable CITES documentation. U.S.